Friday, August 30, 2013

Delicately Sculpted Busts by Gosia

Currently living and working in Toronto, artist Gosia recently completed work on a series of beautiful sculpted busts made from polymer clay and gypsum. Titled Pearl, Luna, and Eva the works are an extension of her earlier paintings and are her first foray into sculpting. The artist shares via email: It is an absolute thrill and pleasure to sculpt. Just as the final pieces have more dimension so does the experience of creating them. With every new figure I fight an internal “battle” of staying true to my posing model and creating someone from my imagination. The result ends up somewhere in between with elements inspired by neo-romanticism and fantasy. Pearl, Luna and Eva are the first pieces in an ongoing series of originals created from casts of one bust. I had modeled a bald figure, made a mold and cast what i like to call my “blank canvases”. I then hand model unique details on each piece, just as you would to a blank canvas, creating “someone” new each time. The new pieces will be on view at a show at Wall Space Art Gallery in Ottawa starting October 10th. You can see much more on her website.

Human Movement Converted Into Digital Sculptures

I’m really enjoying the visuals in this series of four idents for CCTV that translate human motion into digitally sculpted objects that look like steel, water, and wood. The clips were created by Taiwan design house JL Design and KORB. If you liked this also check out the photography of Shinichi Maruyama or Choros.

Manifest Station: A Transparent Utility Box Painted by Mona Caron

This fun piece was painted by illustrator and muralist Mona Caron on Duboce Avenue at Church Street in San Francisco. Titled Manifest Station, the small mural was painted on a standard utility box and has to be viewed from a specific spot so that the horizon lines of the artwork match those of the actual intersection. As an added bonus, a mural in the background which was repainted in part on the utility box is actually an older piece by the same artist. Caron is currently working on a surprisngly great series of weeds and just painted a giant wildflower in Union City.

The Geometric Artwork of Andy Gilmore

Rochester-based artist Andy Gilmore turns math into art, creating hypnotizing and kaledscopic patterns that are heavily influenced by patterns he encounters in nature as well as music. The prolific artist has numerous commercial clients including Wired, Nike, and the New York Times, but has also released his own visual compositions through Ghostly International Editions since 2010. Gilmore just released a new body of work and sat down with Ghostly in the video above to talk about his process and influence.


Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso

In this ongoing series titled Unlikely, artist and photographer Giuseppe Colarusso imagines bizarre and humorous objects, each of which is either technically impossible, improbable, or simply useless in its proposed design. Colarusso tells me via email that many of the pieces he fabricates himself, however some are digitally created in Photoshop. So what’s the point? He hopes each image will make you stop, think and hopefully bring a smile to your face, which is definitely a worthy cause. Also, I would pay top dollar for that spray paint can with adjustable hue sliders, so could somebody make that? See some 50+ additional concepts over on his website.

Torafu’s Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art

In an attempt to better engage the youngest visitors to the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo, Torafu Architects created a special art gallery just for kids called Haunted House. On entering the exhibition a few familiar artworks appear hung in frames around a large white cube, but something is clearly amiss as everything appears to be moving. The eyes in a portrait dart back and forth, a pair of hands emerges from Mona Lisa’s face and begins to manipulate the painting, the head of a portrait turns around in loops, and then a wave of relief as children realize this isn’t another crummy art gallery with old boring art. A secret passageway leads to the cube’s interior where almost every artwork can be manipulated or altered from behind, a place where the art can be touched and kids are free to laugh, run and play while interacting directly with some of the world’s most famous paintings. A killer idea.